New Arrival: Brandon Hills Vineyard

In keeping with my New Year Resolution – we have a new vineyard at Barnhills.  We now carry 5 wines from Brandon Hills Vineyard.

Barbera:        Fruity with hints of smoke and vanilla, this Northern Italian red wine is low in tannin and slightly higher in acid. Pairs well with grilled or smoked meats and tomato based sauces.

Raptor Red:  Our premier red wine blend, 46% Cabernet Sauvignon, 43% Merlot and the remaining made up from Cab Franc, Petit Verdot and Viognier. One dollar of every sale of this wine will benefit Carolina Raptor Center.

Viognier:  (VEE-ohn-YAY) This French Rhone Varietal is characterized by its floral aroma and peachy flavors with a hint of apricot. Our wine has fruity flavors throughout the palette

Amaretto Amore and Brandon Berry Black.

Come check out these wonderful wines!   Enjoy!

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New Year’s Resolutions

Are you going to make a New Year’s Resolution this year?  I usually don’t (because I can never keep them), but this year I am going to make 2.

The first one is personal in that I am going to try to be more healthy (active) this year.  Not necessarily to lose weight, but to be more healthy.  That means exercising a little more (alright then – start exercising) and try eating a little less at each meal and making better decisions about what to eat.

The second one is for the business.  I am going to try to post at least 2 blogs a week about all the interesting, new & exciting things that are happening at Barnhills.  I will talk about upcoming events, new book or art arrivals or just whatever comes to mind.  Please bear with me – because writing is not my forte, but I will do my best.

Hope that you have a wonderful, healthy and prosperous new year.

Thais

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Test

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This Week at Barnhills

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Pitch the Publisher in conjunction with Second Wind Publishing

Mike Simpson
Publisher
Second Wind Publishing, LLC
 
Call or email to reserve your time.
 
You will be given a one hour block, and must be present at the beginning of that time. When your name is called you have ten minutes to pitch the publisher!
 
Your novel must be complete in order to pitch it. Be prepared to email your full book just in case asked.

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Pitch the Publisher

Mike Simpson
Publisher
Second Wind Publishing, LLC
 
Call or email to reserve your time.
 
You will be given a one hour block, and must be present at the beginning of that time. When your name is called you have ten minutes to pitch the publisher!
 
Your novel must be complete in order to pitch it. Be prepared to email your full book just in case asked.

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Coming Soon to Barnhills: Green Gospel by I.C. Fiore

Here is a great review that was published in the Greensboro News & Record on Oct.  18th about this book.

 

 

Page Turners

Books with a North Carolina accent.

October 18, 2011

Dark green

Image accompanying article

The new novel, “Green Gospel,” the first by Durham resident L.C. Fiore, examines an age-old question: Can people change? The question, this time, is posed in terms that burn and explode. It’s a story so today that the actions that drive it could be online at the Huffington Post right now.

Ecoterrorist Edie Aberdeen, a California college dropout, is on the run from the FBI in the opening scene. She has hooked up with a coyote hauling a truckload of illegal immigrants to harvest crops in Florida. She’s fleeing the botched firebombing of a lab in San Francisco. She’s not sure, but she might have killed her lover in the chaos at the lab.

I’ll pause a minute here so you can check for such a posting. …

Aberdeen winds up in the fictional small town of Arcadia, which seems to be Central Florida, somewhere north of the theme parks. She becomes a live-in nanny with a single mom. The mom is struggling to raise two small boys on a hospital aide’s salary. As Edie emotionally adopts them, they, in turn, almost literally adopt her. The rhythms of their domesticity allow the novel to examine the nature of family and community.

People aren’t born terrorists. It’s a job you learn. Aberdeen’s political development and growing frustrations with situations that seem immune to change are nicely developed. She’s entirely believable.

She isn’t the only well-drawn character. The novel has several. Mae — she’s the hospital aide — is overweight, overworked and unable to keep a clean house and properly feed and clothe her two young sons. Her ne’er-do-well husband, in and out of jail, is mostly absent. But the emotional carnage he left in the household is present every day. One of the boys doesn’t talk since his father left.

The author tagged him with a terrible name, Vester, which I found annoying. It’s one of those Southern backwoods names that reeks of stereotypes. The meanest country boy I ever met was named Roger.

Mae is a member of a fundamentalist church, whose pastor, the Rev. Reginald Dancer, is trying to salvage his career through a gospel-inspired solar farm. He doesn’t think small, but financial machinations and a declining membership are putting the squeeze on him.

Mae is so insistent that Aberdeen becomes involved in the church, too. One of the nicest scenes in the novel is the church Christmas pageant, which centers on what is called the Living Christmas Tree. The choir stands on scaffolding to project a tree effect. At the top of the tree, just under the roof of the church, stands the star, Edie Aberdeen.

What makes the tree such a rich metaphor is that it echoes an earlier scene in the novel. Aberdeen is a true-blue tree hugger. She camped in the branches of a California redwood in an attempt to prevent the tract from being logged. It ended in disaster, further radicalizing her.

So, when she’s in the Christmas tree, a comic situation, the scene is filled with tension as you remember the earlier tree episode. Fiore deserves a congratulations for bringing this off.

Fiore is communications coordinator of the N.C. Writers Network, based in Carrboro. He holds an M.A. in creative writing from Northwestern and has had several short stories published.

His sentences sound forced at times: “She felt the pavement spin as if she were the handle of a Chinese yo-yo — flimsy and brightly colored paper twirling in a child’s hand.” In another instance, “gliding through intersections like the blade of an ice skate glides across a frozen lake.” He was describing a car.

The annoyances and shortcomings are small. This is a well-written, well-structured novel.

So, can people change? Yes, some can. Some do.

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